When Bootleg = Good News

John Coltrane-A Love Supreme album coverAfter a great gig last weekend at Jazz Cafe – the place where my group, Jazz Jamaica was born – as part of the London International Ska Festival, I’m heading off to Leicester with my quartet on Saturday, 26 April to mark 50 Years of John Coltrane‘s superb recording:  A Love Supreme. We’ll be performing as part of the 2nd Bootleg Jazz Festival held at The Cookie.

Bootleg Jazz Festival logo

Note, this is a change in programme as I had originally arranged to present Groundation but we had to change plans at the last minute.  Although the Festival has been fantastic in accommodating the change in band, unfortunately their website is still showing the old programme. So, ignore that and read this instead!

Encapsulating the redemptive spirit of the 1960s, award-winning bassist and band leader, Gary Crosby pays homage to one of the most influential and inspiring albums in the jazz canon, John Coltrane’s A Love Supreme to mark its 50th Anniversary year. With his outstanding quartet – including Denys Baptiste (tenor sax), Joe Armon-Jones (piano) and Rod Youngs (drums) – tonight’s performance of this all-time classic will bring you the closest you may ever get to feeling the spirit of Coltrane in a live situation.

It’ll be great to play with my sparring partners, Denys and Rod and to have another Tomorrow’s Warriors alumnus, Joe on piano (reminds me of a young Andrew McCormack) on the gig. 

Hope very much to see lots of my Leicester-based family and friends turn out for this show. It’s a very special piece of music that has stood the test of time and you need to be there to experience it!

Keisher Downie features with Jazz Jamaica in London Ska Festival – 19 April

Keisher DownieApril is fast approaching and I’m really looking forward to working again with vocalist, Keisher Downie. She’s only done a couple of Jazz Jamaica gigs with us so far (including our Royal Festival Hall Catch A Fire show last year), so you may not have seen her with us yet, but she’s a wonderful singer whose voice blends really well with the band.

If you haven’t managed to catch Keisher singing live with Jazz Jamaica, go get a ticket for our upcoming show at Jazz Café, Camden on 19 April as part of the London International Ska Festival. You won’t regret it!

 

Jazz Jamaica to play London International Ska Festival 2014

London Intl Ska Festival 2013

Happy to be part of the London International Ska Festival on Saturday 19 April with Jazz Jamaica. Will be great fun getting back to the venue where Jazz Jamaica was born…The Jazz Café, Camden. It’s all Jon Dabner’s fault…THANK YOU, JON for giving me that break!

REVIEW: Gary Crosby’s Groundation at Arena Theatre

garycrosbybass:

We had FANTASTIC gig at The Arena Theatre in Wolverhampton on Friday. It was a real trek getting there and back through 80mph wind gust and sheets of rain, but it was well worth the effort. Thanks to everyone who braved the weather to get there.  A wonderful, appreciative audience. And thanks very much also to Alison and her great production team at The Arena for looking after us so well. We’re looking forward to seeing you again very soon!

Originally posted on thejazzbreakfast:

Gary Crosby's Groundation at the Arena Theatre (Photo copyright John Watson/jazzcamera.co.uk)

Gary Crosby’s Groundation at the Arena Theatre (Photo © John Watson/jazzcamera.co.uk)

Arena Theatre, Wolverhampton UK
14-02-2014
Review and photograph by John Watson 

Bassist Gary Crosby has long been a key figure on the scene, and he has the knack of creating some exceptional musical surprises.

As the boss of Dune Music, as artistic director of Tomorrow’s Warriors and as leader of the Jazz Jamaica All Stars and his bands Nu Troop and Guava, Gary established himself as a key figure on the scene, working with major established artists and also providing a platform for a great deal of exciting new talent.

His current band – Groundation – marks another milestone in the bassist’s career, featuring him with three acclaimed young players: alto saxophonist Nathaniel Facey (of Empirical), guitarist Shirley Tetteh, and drummer Moses Boyd. On Friday the musicians battled their way from London through the storms and reached the Arena Theatre…

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RIP Mat Fox

Originally posted on Tomorrow's Warriors:

Mat Fox - Kinetika Bloco It was with deep and sincere sadness, and complete shock, that we learned of the untimely passing of our good  friend,  Mat Fox, Musical Director of Kinetika Bloco on 7 February.

Mat was a true Warrior, a real, honest to goodness, grass roots worker. Using his role as a teacher in South London schools, and as leader of his wonderful Kinetika Bloco project that he founded in 2000, he championed diversity and was an ambassador for gender equality. Together we opened a pathway for a number of our current and former Tomorrow’s Warriors to further their musical careers.

Mat will be greatly missed by so many of the young people and their parents, and those of us who knew him as a friend and fellow soldier, working in the field to bring about a positive change in young people’s lives.

All of us at Tomorrow’s Warriors send our love and warmest…

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Getting ready for some Groundation

After working in Denys Baptiste’s 14-piece band on his powerful Now Is The Time…Let Freedom Ring! project, I’m taking some time out to work with my own comparatively small band, Groundation with the wonderful Nathaniel Facey (alto sax), Shirley Tetteh (guitar) and Moses Boyd (drums). I love this band! Everyone has a chance to express themselves and there’s a nice chilled vibe amongst us.

A few gigs coming up:

Fri 31 Jan | SHEFFIELD – Millennium Hall

Sun 02 Feb | SOUTHAMPTON – The Bent Brief 

Fri 14 Feb | WOLVERHAMPTON – Arena Theatre

Hope to see lots of new and familiar faces…

Roll on Brother Ronny Jordan. RIP (1962-2014)

Ronny JordanIt’s so very sad to hear of the death of Brother Ronny Jordan

Ronny was a polite, chilled, likeable guy. Although I was asked, we never got around to playing a formal gig together, just a couple of jam sessions. He knew of my uncle, Ernest Ranglin so we always had something to talk about. We even spoke a few times about the possibility of Ronny doing a Jazz Jamaica set with us one day.

Ronny was one of a group of talented West Londoners I met in the mid-Eighties. He shone a light that helped show many British-born African-Caribbean musicians a world of opportunity beyond our shores, and provided employment and an artistic outlet for many young musicians for nigh on 20 years. Overall, my impression of Ronny is that he was a giver more than a taker. I liked and admired him a lot.

He also did something rare that will be remembered forever: he had a Jazz hit, making his success a success for the whole of the UK Jazz scene.

Roll on Brother Ronny Jordan. RIP.